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Welcome To The Insighter!

Explore the latest happenings at Kirtland FCU and learn about important topics from around the financial world. Here’s your insight!

All Posts > Retirement

Investments Retirement Estate Planning



Where are all your important documents? Are they centralized and organized so you (or your family) could easily find needed information. Now is the time to get it together!

Before retirement begins, gather what you need. Put as much documentation as you can in one place, for you and those you love. It could be a password-protected online vault; it could be a file cabinet; it could be a file folder. Regardless of your method, by centralizing the location of important papers you are saving yourself from disorganization and headaches in the future.
 
What should go in the vault, cabinet or folder(s)? Crucial financial information and more. You will want to include:
  • Those quarterly/annual statements. Recent performance paperwork for IRAs, 401(k)s, funds, brokerage accounts and so forth. Include the statements from the latest quarter and the statements from the end of the previous calendar year (that is, the last Q4 statement you received). You no longer get paper statements? Print out the equivalent, or if you really want to minimize clutter, just print out the links to the online statements. (Someone is going to need your passwords, of course.) These documents can also become handy in figuring out a retirement income distribution strategy.
  • Healthcare benefit info. Are you enrolled in Medicare or a Medicare Advantage plan? Are you in a group health plan? Do you pay for your own health coverage? Own a long-term care policy? Gather the policies together in your new retirement command center and include related literature so you can study their benefit summaries, coverage options, and rules and regulations. Contact info for insurers, HMOs, your doctor(s) and the insurance agent who sold you a particular policy should also go in here.
  • Life insurance info. Do you have a straight term insurance policy with no potential for cash value whatsoever? Keep a record of when the level premiums end. If you have a whole life policy, you need paperwork communicating the death benefit, the present cash value in the policy and the required monthly premiums.
  • Beneficiary designation forms. Few pre-retirees realize that beneficiary designations often take priority over requests made in a will when it comes to 401(k)s, 403(b)s and IRAs. Hopefully, you have retained copies of these forms. If not, you can request them from the account custodians and review the choices you have made. Are they choices you would still make today? By reviewing them in the company of a retirement planner or an attorney, you can gauge the tax efficiency of the eventual transfer of assets.1
  • Social Security basics. If you have not claimed benefits yet, put your Social Security card, your W-2 form from last year, certified copies of your birth certificate, marriage license or divorce papers in one place, and military discharge paperwork and a copy of your W-2 form for last year (or Schedule SE and Schedule C plus 1040 form, if you work for yourself), and military discharge papers or proof of citizenship, if applicable. Take a look at your Social Security statement that tracks your accrued benefits (online or hard copy) and make a screengrab of it or print it out.2
  • Pension matters. Will you receive a bona fide pension in retirement? If so, you want to collect any special letters or bulletins from your employer. You want your Individual Benefit Statement telling you about the benefits you have earned and for which you may become eligible; you also want the Summary Plan Description and contact info for someone at the employee benefits department where you worked.
  • Real estate documents. Gather up your deed, mortgage docs, property tax statements and homeowner insurance policy. Also, make a list of the contents of your home and their estimated value – you may be away from your home more in retirement, so those items may be more vulnerable as a consequence.
  • Estate planning paperwork. Put copies of your estate plan and any trust paperwork within the collection, and of course a will. In case of a crisis of mind or body, your loved ones may need to find a durable power of attorney or health care directive, so include those documents if you have them and let them know where to find them.
  • Tax returns. Should you only keep your 1040 and state return from the previous year? How about those for the past seven years? Or have you kept every one since 1982 or 1974? At the very least, you should have a copy of returns from the prior year in this collection.
  • A list of your digital assets. We all have them now, and they are far from trivial—the contents of a cloud, a photo library, or a Facebook page may be vital to your image or your business. Passwords must be compiled too, of course. 
This will take a little work, but you will be glad you did it someday. Consider this a Saturday morning or weekend project. It may lead to some discoveries and possibly prompt some alterations to your financial picture as you prepare for retirement.

Come talk to the Wealth Management Advisors at Kirtland Financial Services for a retirement check-up and make sure you’re on track!

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT
 
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Not NCUA Insured | No Credit Union Guarantee | May Lose Value
Securities and Financial Planning services offered through LPL Financial. A registered investment advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. The investment products sold through LPL Financial are not insured Kirtland Federal Credit Union deposits and are not NCUA insured. These products are not obligations of Kirtland Federal Credit Union and are not endorsed, recommended or guaranteed by < insert credit union name > or any government agency. The value of the investment may fluctuate, the return on the investment is not guaranteed, and loss of principal is possible.

Citations 1 - fpanet.org/ToolsResources/ArticlesBooksChecklists/Articles/Retirement/10EssentialDocumentsforRetirement/ [9/12/11] 2 - cbsnews.com/news/planning-for-retirement-take-inventory/ [3/18/13] )

Investments Retirement

 

New retirees sometimes worry that they are spending too much, too soon. Should they scale back? Are they at risk of outliving their money?

This concern is legitimate. Rates of spending are not uniform throughout retirement.

  1. The initial stage of retirement can be expensive. New retirees are eager to execute the plans they’ve made. As they travel, make purchases, and enjoy their new life, spending peaks.

  2. Retirees in their sixties should realize that their spending will likely decline as they age. 

  3. When retirees are well into their seventies, spending decreases further. In fact, Government Accountability Office data shows that people age 75–79 spend 41% less on average than people in their peak spending years (usually in the late 40s).

  4. Spending lowers even furthers as retirees enter their eighties. Once many retirees are into their eighties, they have traveled and pursued their goals to a great degree. Spending time with grandkids, rather than spending money, becomes the focus.

  5. One study finds that medical costs burden retirees mostly at the end of life. BlackRock’s 2017 study on retiree spending patterns found medical expenses only spiked for most retirees in the last two years of their lives. 

The Wealth Management Advisors at Kirtland Financial Services can help you plan for these shifts in spending while you’re building your retirement plan.

YOUR INITIAL CONSULTATION IS FREE!

At Kirtland Financial Services, a team of experienced Wealth Management Advisors is ready to help you bring your goals into focus and help you make a plan to work toward the financial future you want.

Your first visit is absolutely free! Sit down with your Wealth Management Advisor—they’ll get to know you and your goals, and you’ll learn about a wide variety of investing options. 


MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT NOW!

 
Not NCUA Insured | No Credit Union Guarantee | May Lose Value
Securities and Financial Planning services offered through LPL Financial. A registered investment advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Insurance products offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates. Kirtland Federal Credit Union and Kirtland Financial Services are not registered broker/dealers and are not affiliated with LPL Financial.
 

Investments Retirement


As Americans, we can take pride in the many things we do well. But there’s one thing that we could all do better— saving for the future. 

If you are already saving for your retirement through your employer-sponsored savings plan, each contribution you make brings you closer to your retirement goal. But are you saving as much as you can? 

Given the uncertainty surrounding the Social Security system, maybe it’s time to rethink your own saving habits. 

  1. Apply a raise or bonus to retirement savings. Boosting your contribution rate with each increase in pay you receive to move you closer to the maximum contribution allowed by your employer—$18,500 to a 401(k) plan (workers age 50 and older may add an additional $6,000 in catch-up contributions, subject to plan limits). 
  2. Cut back household expenses. Small savings can add up. Set up a monthly budget of income and expenses to help you find ways to cut back more. 
  3. Forgo a tax refund. If you typically get a tax refund, consider revising your W-4 form to reduce your withholding. Your paycheck will grow, allowing you to increase the amount you save in your employer’s retirement plan. 

It really doesn't matter how you save. The important thing is to build your retirement account in ways that work for you.
 
The team at Kirtland Financial Services is ready to help you put together a retirement plan that works for you. And your initial consultation is absolutely free!

 

MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT NOW!

 
Not NCUA Insured | No Credit Union Guarantee | May Lose Value
Securities and Financial Planning services offered through LPL Financial. A registered investment advisor. Member FINRA/SIPC. Insurance products offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates. Kirtland Federal Credit Union and Kirtland Financial Services are not registered broker/dealers and are not affiliated with LPL Financial.

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