Experiencing a financial hardship because of the Three Rivers Fire? We can help! Call us at 1-800-880-5328 to learn more.


Kirtland FCU will be performing system maintenance on Sunday, May 16 between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Online, Mobile, and Telephone Banking will be intermittently unavailable.

×
Routing Number: 307070050
Search
Search Our Site
Type a word or phrase in the search field below. If you are unable to find the information you are looking for, please contact us.
Kirtland Federal Credit Union logo

 

We're Invested

Retirement, investments, financial planning for every stage of life—learn about it all here at Invested,
a blog from your Wealth Management Advisors at Kirtland Financial Services.

All Posts > Savings

Savings Retirement

Because long-term care insurance (LTCI) is a relatively new product, policies are not standardized. This can make it especially difficult to compare policies when you're shopping for this type of insurance. However, comparing LTCI policies is a lot easier when you know what to look for and follow a few simple guidelines.
 

Compare insurance companies


One of your first steps should be to compare and evaluate insurance companies. But since there are many companies that sell LTCI, how do you narrow the field down to a few good ones? You can start by talking to friends, family members, or anyone else you know who's bought LTCI. How satisfied have these people been with their companies' handling of claims and overall customer service? To learn more about company reputations, check out consumer websites and publications. You can also contact your state's insurance department for information about different companies, such as customer complaints lodged within the last year.

In addition, there are private firms that make a business of rating insurance companies, usually on a letter-grade scale. Some of the well-known rating service firms are A. M. Best, Moody's, The Street.com (formerly Weiss), Fitch, and Standard& Poor's. You can contact one of these firms directly, though their ratings may be available at your local public library. The ratings are typically based on a company's financial strength and other factors. Financial strength is particularly important because it tells you whether a company is likely to meet its future claims payments and other obligations.
 

Compare policy ins and outs


As mentioned, there is no standard LTCI policy or contract--specific benefits and features often vary widely from one policy to another. That's why detailed policy comparisons are more important with LTCI than with any other type of insurance. Once you've narrowed your list of insurance companies down to a few (e.g., three or four), ask each company for some sample policies to review. Each sample should include an Outline of Coverage section at the beginning of the policy. This section briefly summarizes the policy's benefits and highlights the major features. After you read this section, read through the entire policy to make sure you understand all of the provisions. Here are some key items to look for:
 
  • Waiting period: This is the period of time that must pass before the insurance company will begin to pay benefits. It can be anywhere from 0 to 365 days. You'll be asked to select a waiting period--the shorter the period, the more the policy will cost.
  • Duration of benefits (known as the benefit period): You'll also be asked to select a benefit period (e.g., two years or a lifetime)--the longer the period, the more costly the policy. Watch out for caps placed on the total lifetime benefits you can receive if the policy lets you carry over unused daily benefits beyond the scheduled benefit period.
  • Nursing home and home health-care daily benefit: This is the amount of coverage you select as your daily benefit limit (e.g., $50, $200).
  • Cost-of-living rider: This feature provides protection against loss of purchasing power due to inflation. It increases your coverage every year to keep pace with inflation (either based on the Consumer Price Index or at a fixed percentage rate).
  • Range of care: A policy may provide coverage for different levels of care, such as skilled, intermediate, and/or custodial. A good policy should cover all levels of care.
  • Pre-existing conditions: A waiting period (e.g., six months) may be imposed before you can receive coverage for any pre-existing conditions you might have.
  • Other exclusions: Some policies may not cover certain medical conditions (e.g., Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease). Others may specify that you have to be in certain types of facilities.
  • Premium increases: Some policies may have a level premium for the period that the policy is in effect. In other cases, the premium may increase during the policy period.
  • Waiver of premium: Most policies waive your premium after you've received benefits for a certain number of days, but sometimes only if you're receiving care in certain types of facilities.
  • Guaranteed renewability: Most policies give you the option to renew the policy and maintain your coverage, despite any changes in your health.
  • Grace period: Most policies give you a grace period if you're late with a premium payment (usually 30 days). This means that the policy will remain in effect during that period.
  • Restoration of benefits: This is a feature that restores your benefits if you recover from your condition and do not require care for a consecutive period (e.g., 180 or 365 days).
  • Return of premium: You may be entitled to a return of premiums paid (or a nonforfeiture of benefits or a continuation of benefits for a limited period of time) if you cancel your policy after paying premiums for a number of years.
  • Prior hospitalization: Some policies require a hospital stay before you can qualify for benefits under the policy. This requirement is less common than it used to be, and you should probably avoid policies that include this provision.

How do the policies you're considering stack up against each other? Which benefits and features mean the most to you? How much can you customize each policy to your needs? These are very important questions. Knowing how to evaluate LTCI coverage in light of your own needs is the key to comparing and weeding out policies. Your final list of policies should include only ones that can offer exactly what you're looking for.
 

Compare premiums


Because LTCI policies vary so much, simple premium comparisons usually don't provide useful results. You run the risk of comparing premiums for policies that don't provide comparable coverage. For example, suppose you're comparing two LTCI policies with different premiums. If the more expensive policy has a larger daily benefit and longer benefit period, it may be difficult to tell which policy is the better buy. Variations in the length of the elimination period and other features may further muddy the waters. The point is that you want a policy that gives you the best total value, and the premium is only one part of the equation.

Still, the premium is important because you don't want to pay more for coverage than you have to. And you want to be sure you can afford the premiums as time goes on. Once you know your coverage needs and find a few policies that offer a good fit, you should then compare premiums. The price of an LTCI policy typically depends on the specifics of the coverage, your age at the time you buy the policy (most companies won't sell you a policy if you're under 40 or over 84), your medical history, the cost of long- term care where you live, and other factors. Note that premiums may vary widely between companies, even for policies that provide comparable coverage. The more similar the policies you're comparing, the more the premium will tell you about a policy's true value.
 

Consider getting help


Because LTCI is complicated, comparing and evaluating policies is no easy task. You can do it alone if you choose, but you're probably better off getting professional help. A qualified insurance professional, or financial professional, such as the Wealth Management Advisors with Kirtland Financial Services, can assist you with this entire process. To find the right person to help you, seek word-of-mouth references and be very selective.

Make an appointment with Kirtland Financial Services today!

Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and may not be invested into directly.

The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax planning or legal advice. We suggest that you consult with a qualified tax or legal professional.

LPL Financial Representatives offer access to Trust Services through The Private Trust Company N.A., an affiliate of LPL Financial.

Savings Retirement

During your working years, you've probably set aside funds in retirement accounts such as IRAs, 401(k)s, or other workplace savings plans, as well as in taxable accounts. Your challenge during retirement is to convert those savings into an ongoing income stream that will provide adequate income throughout your retirement years.
 

Setting a withdrawal rate


The retirement lifestyle you can afford will depend not only on your assets and investment choices, but also on how quickly you draw down your retirement portfolio. The annual percentage that you take out of your portfolio, whether from returns or both returns and principal, is known as your withdrawal rate. Figuring out an appropriate initial withdrawal rate is a key issue in retirement planning and presents many challenges. Why? Take out too much too soon, and you might run out of money in your later years. Take out too little, and you might not enjoy your retirement years as much as you could. Your withdrawal rate is especially important in the early years of your retirement, as it will have a lasting impact on how long your savings last.

One widely used guideline on withdrawal rates for tax-deferred retirement accounts that emerged in the 1990s stated that withdrawing slightly more than 4% annually from a balanced portfolio of large-cap equities and bonds would provide inflation-adjusted income for at least 30 years. However, more recent studies have found that this guideline may be too generalized. Individuals may not be able to sustain a 4% withdrawal rate, or may even be able to support a higher rate, depending on their individual circumstances. The bottom line is that there is no standard guideline that works for everyone — your particular withdrawal rate needs to take into account many factors, including, but not limited to, your asset allocation and projected rate of return, annual income targets (accounting for inflation as desired), investment horizon, and life expectancy.1
 

Which assets should you draw from first?


You may have assets in accounts that are taxable (e.g., CDs, mutual funds), tax deferred (e.g., traditional IRAs), and tax free (e.g., Roth IRAs). Given a choice, which type of account should you withdraw from first? The answer is — it depends.

For retirees who don't care about leaving an estate to beneficiaries, the answer is simple in theory: withdraw money from taxable accounts first, then tax-deferred accounts, and lastly, tax-free accounts. By using your tax-favored accounts last, and avoiding taxes as long as possible, you'll keep more of your retirement dollars working for you.

For retirees who intend to leave assets to beneficiaries, the analysis is more complicated. You need to coordinate your retirement planning with your estate plan. For example, if you have appreciated or rapidly appreciating assets, it may be more advantageous for you to withdraw from tax-deferred and tax-free accounts first. This is because these accounts will not receive a step-up in basis at your death, as many of your other assets will.

However, this may not always be the best strategy. For example, if you intend to leave your entire estate to your spouse, it may make sense to withdraw from taxable accounts first. This is because spouses are given preferential tax treatment with regard to retirement plans. A surviving spouse can roll over retirement plan funds to his or her own IRA or retirement plan, or, in some cases, may continue the deceased spouse's plan as his or her own. The funds in the plan continue to grow tax deferred, and distributions need not begin until the spouse's own required beginning date.

The bottom line is that this decision is also a complicated one. A financial professional such as the Wealth Management Advisors at Kirtland Financial Services can help you determine the best course based on your individual circumstances.
 

Certain distributions are required


In practice, your choice of which assets to draw first may, to some extent, be directed by tax rules. You can't keep your money in tax-deferred retirement accounts forever. The law requires you to start taking distributions — called "required minimum distributions" or RMDs — from traditional IRAs by April 1 of the year following the year you turn age 72, whether you need the money or not. For employer plans, RMDs must begin by April 1 of the year following the year you turn 72 or, if later, the year you retire. Roth IRAs aren't subject to the lifetime RMD rules. (Beneficiaries of either type of IRA are required to take RMDs after the IRA owner's death.)2

If you have more than one IRA, a required distribution is calculated separately for each IRA. These amounts are then added together to determine your RMD for the year. You can withdraw your RMD from any one or more of your IRAs. (Your traditional IRA trustee or custodian must tell you how much you're required to take out each year, or offer to calculate it for you.) For employer retirement plans, your plan will calculate the RMD, and distribute it to you. (If you participate in more than one employer plan, your RMD will be determined separately for each plan.)

It's important to take RMDs into account when contemplating how you'll withdraw money from your savings. Why? If you withdraw less than your RMD, you will pay a penalty tax equal to 50% of the amount you failed to withdraw. The good news: you can always withdraw more than your RMD amount.
 

Annuity distributions


If you've used an annuity for part of your retirement savings, at some point you'll need to consider your options for converting the annuity into income. You can choose to simply withdraw earnings (or earnings and principal) from the annuity. There are several ways of doing this. You can withdraw all of the money in the annuity (both the principal and earnings) in one lump sum. You can also withdraw the money over a period of time through regular or irregular withdrawals. By choosing to make withdrawals from your annuity, you continue to have control over money you have invested in the annuity. However, if you systematically withdraw the principal and the earnings from the annuity, there is no guarantee that the funds in the annuity will last for your entire lifetime, unless you have separately purchased a rider that provides guaranteed minimum income payments for life (without annuitization).
In general, your withdrawals will be subject to income tax — on an "income-first" basis — to the extent your cash surrender value exceeds your investment in the contract. The taxable portion of your withdrawal may also be subject to a 10% early distribution penalty if you haven't reached age 59 1/2, unless an exception applies.

A second distribution option is called the guaranteed income (or annuitization) option. If you select this option, your annuity will be "annuitized," which means that the current value of your annuity is converted into a stream of payments. This allows you to receive a guaranteed income stream from the annuity. The annuity issuer promises to pay you an amount of money on a periodic basis (e.g., monthly, yearly, etc).*

If you elect to annuitize, the periodic payments you receive are called annuity payouts. You can elect to receive either a fixed amount for each payment period or a variable amount for each period. You can receive the income stream for your entire lifetime (no matter how long you live), or you can receive the income stream for a specific time period (ten years, for example). You can also elect to receive annuity payouts over your lifetime and the lifetime of another person (called a "joint and survivor annuity"). The amount you receive for each payment period will depend on the cash value of the annuity, how earnings are credited to your account (whether fixed or variable), and the age at which you begin receiving annuity payments. The length of the distribution period will also affect how much you receive. For example, if you are 65 years old and elect to receive annuity payments over your entire lifetime, the amount of each payment you'll receive will be less than if you had elected to receive annuity payouts over five years.

Each annuity payment is part nontaxable return of your investment in the contract and part payment of taxable accumulated earnings (until the investment in the contract is exhausted). You have many options for converting your savings to retirement income. Kirtland Financial Services specializes in helping retirees plan their path.

Get started with Kirtland Financial Services today!

1. "Is the 4 Percent Rule Too Low or Too High?" Journal of Financial Planning, onefpa.org, 2019

2. Due to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, required minimum distributions (RMDs) are waived in 2020.

* Guarantees are subject to the claims-paying ability and financial strength of the issuing insurance company.

Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and may not be invested into directly.

The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax planning or legal advice. We suggest that you consult with a qualified tax or legal professional.

LPL Financial Representatives offer access to Trust Services through The Private Trust Company N.A., an affiliate of LPL Financial.

Savings Retirement

By investing for retirement through your employer-sponsored plan, you are helping to manage a critically important financial risk: the chance that you will outlive your money. But choosing to participate is just one step in your financial risk management strategy. You also need to manage risk within your account to help it stay on track. Following are steps to consider.


Familiarize yourself with the different types of risk


All investments, even the most conservative, come with different types of risk. Understanding these risks will help you make educated choices in your retirement savings plan mix. Here are just a few.
 
  • Market risk: The risk that your investment could lose value due to falling prices caused by outside forces, such as economic factors or political and national events (e.g., elections or natural disasters). Stocks are typically most susceptible to market risk, although bonds and other investments can be affected as well.
  • Interest rate risk: The risk that an investment's value will fall due to rising interest rates. This type of risk is most associated with bonds, as bond prices typically fall when interest rates rise, and vice versa. But often stocks also react to changing interest rates.
  • Inflation risk: The chance that your investments will not keep pace with inflation, or the rising cost of living. Investing too conservatively may put your investment dollars at risk of losing their purchasing power.
  • Liquidity risk: This is the risk of not being able to quickly sell or cash-in your investment if you need access to the money.
  • Risks associated with international investing: Currency fluctuations, political upheavals, unstable economies, additional taxes--these are just some of the special risks associated with investing outside the United States.


Know your personal risk tolerance


How much risk are you willing to take to pursue your savings goal? Gauging your personal risk tolerance--or your ability to endure losses in your account due to swings in the market--is an important step in your risk management strategy. Because all investments involve some level of risk, it's important to be aware of how much volatility you can comfortably withstand before you select investments.

One way to do this is to reflect on a series of questions, which may include the following:
 
  • How much do you need to accumulate to potentially provide for a comfortable retirement? The more you need to save, the more risk you may need to take in pursuit of that goal.
  • How well would you sleep at night knowing your investments dropped 5%? 10%? 20%? Would you flee to "safer" options? Ride out the dip to strive for longer-term returns? Or maybe even view the downturn as a good opportunity to buy more shares at a value price?
  • How much time do you have until you will need the money? Typically, the longer your time horizon, the more you may be able to hold steady during short-term downturns in pursuit of longer- term goals--and the more risk you may be able to assume.
  • Do you have savings and investments outside your employer plan, including an easily accessed emergency savings account with at least six months worth of living expenses? Having a safety net set aside may allow you to feel more confident about taking on risk in your retirement portfolio.
Your plan's educational materials may offer worksheets and other tools to help you gauge your own risk tolerance. Such materials typically ask a series of questions similar to those above, and then generate a score based on your answers that may help guide you toward a mix of investments that may be appropriate for your situation.


Develop a target asset allocation


Once you understand your risk tolerance, the next step is to develop an asset allocation mix that is suitable for your investment goal while taking your risk tolerance into consideration.

Asset allocation is the process of dividing your investment dollars among the various asset categories offered in your plan, typically stocks, bonds, and cash/stable value investments. Generally, the more tolerant you are of investment risk, the more you may be able to invest in stocks. On the other hand, if you are more risk averse, you may want to invest a larger portion of your portfolio in conservative investments, such as high-grade bonds or cash.

Your time horizon will also help you determine your risk tolerance and asset allocation. If you're a young investor with a hardy tolerance for risk, you might choose an allocation with a high concentration of stocks because you may be able to ride out short-term swings in the value of your portfolio in pursuit of your long-term goals. On the other hand, if retirement is less than 10 years away and you can't afford to risk losing money, your allocation might lean more toward bonds and cash investments. (However, consider that within the bond asset class, there are many different varieties to choose from that are suitable for different risk profiles.)


Be sure to diversify


All investors--whether aggressive, conservative, or somewhere in the middle--can potentially benefit from diversification, which means not putting all your eggs in one basket. Holding a mix of different investments may help your portfolio balance out gains and losses. The principle is that when one investment loses value, another may be holding steady or gaining (although there are no guarantees).

Let's look at the previous examples. Although the young investor may choose to put a large chunk of her retirement account in stocks, she should still consider putting some of the money into bonds and possibly cash to help balance any losses that may occur in the stock portion. Even within the stock allocation, she may want to diversify among different types of stocks, such as domestic, international, growth, and value stocks, to reap any potential gains from each type.

What about more conservative investors, such as those nearing or in retirement? Even for these individuals it is generally advisable to include at least some stock investments in their portfolios to help assets keep pace with the rising cost of living. When a portfolio is invested too conservatively, inflation can slowly erode its purchasing power.


Understanding dollar cost averaging


Your employer-sponsored plan also helps you manage risk automatically through a process called dollar cost averaging (DCA). When you contribute to your plan, chances are you contribute an equal dollar amount each pay period, and that money is then used to purchase shares of the investments you have selected. This process--investing a fixed dollar amount at regular intervals--is DCA. As the prices of the investments you purchase rise and fall over time, you take advantage of the swings by buying fewer shares when prices are high and more shares when prices are low--in essence, following the old investing adage to "buy low." After a period of time, the average cost you pay for the shares you accumulate may be lower than if you had purchased all the shares in one lump sum.

Remember that DCA involves continuous investment in securities regardless of their price. As you think about the potential benefits of DCA, you should also consider your ability to make purchases through extended periods of low or falling prices.


Perform regular maintenance


Although it's generally not necessary to review your retirement portfolio too frequently (e.g., every day or even every week), it is advisable to monitor it at least once per year and as major events occur in your life. During these reviews, you'll want to determine if your risk tolerance has changed and check your asset allocation to determine whether it's still on track. You may want to rebalance--or shift some money from one type of investment to another--to bring your allocation back in line with your original target, presuming it still suits your situation. Or you may want to make other changes in your portfolio to keep it in line with your changing circumstances. Such regular maintenance is critical to help manage risk in your portfolio.

When developing a plan to manage risk, it may also help to seek the advice of a financial professional. An experienced professional can help take emotion out of the equation so that you may make clear, rational decisions.

Get started with Kirtland Financial Services today!
 
All investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal, and there can be no assurance that any investment strategy will be successful. Investments offering a higher potential rate of return also involve a higher level of risk.

Asset allocation, diversification, and dollar cost averaging are methods used to help manage investment risk; they do not guarantee a profit or protect against a loss.

There is no assurance that working with a financial professional will improve your investment results.

Savings Retirement

A chocolate cake. Pasta. A pancake. They're all very different, but they generally involve flour, eggs, and perhaps a liquid. Depending on how much of each ingredient you use, you can get very different outcomes. The same is true of your investments. Balancing a portfolio means combining various types of investments using a recipe that's appropriate for you.
 

Getting an appropriate mix


The combination of investments you choose can be as important as your specific investments. The mix of various asset classes, such as stocks, bonds, and cash alternatives, accounts for most of the ups and downs of a portfolio's returns.

There's another reason to think about the mix of investments in your portfolio. Each type of investment has specific strengths and weaknesses that enable it to play a specific role in your overall investing strategy. Some investments may be chosen for their growth potential. Others may provide regular income. Still others may offer safety or simply serve as a temporary place to park your money. And some investments even try to fill more than one role. Because you probably have multiple needs and desires, you need some combination of investment types.

Balancing how much of each you should include is one of your most important tasks as an investor. That balance between growth, income, and safety is called your asset allocation, and it can help you manage the level and type of risks you face.
 

Balancing risk and return


Ideally, you should strive for an overall combination of investments that minimizes the risk you take in trying to achieve a targeted rate of return. This often means balancing more conservative investments against others that are designed to provide a higher return but that also involve more risk. For example, let's say you want to get a 7.5% return on your money. Your financial professional tells you that in the past, stock market returns have averaged about 10% annually, and bonds roughly 5%. One way to try to achieve your 7.5% return would be by choosing a 50-50 mix of
stocks and bonds. It might not work out that way, of course. This is only a hypothetical illustration, not a real portfolio, and there's no guarantee that either stocks or bonds will perform as they have in the past. But asset allocation gives you a place to start.

Someone living on a fixed income, whose priority is having a regular stream of money coming in, will probably need a very different asset allocation than a young, well-to-do working professional whose priority is saving for a retirement that's 30 years away. Many publications feature model investment portfolios that recommend generic asset allocations based on an investor's age. These can help jump-start your thinking about how to divide up your investments. However, because they're based on averages and hypothetical situations, they shouldn't be seen as definitive. Your asset allocation is — or should be — as unique as you are. Even if two people are the same age and have similar incomes, they may have very different needs and goals. You should make sure your asset allocation is tailored to your individual circumstances.


Many ways to diversify


When financial professionals refer to asset allocation, they're usually talking about overall classes: stocks, bonds, and cash or cash alternatives. However, there are others that also can be used to complement the major asset classes once you've got those basics covered. They include real estate and alternative investments such as hedge funds, private equity, metals, or collectibles.

Even within an asset class, consider how your assets are allocated. For example, if you're investing in stocks, you could allocate a certain amount to large-cap stocks and a different percentage to stocks of smaller companies. Or you might allocate based on geography, putting some money in U.S. stocks and some in foreign companies. Bond investments might be allocated by various maturities, with some money in bonds that mature quickly and some in longer-term bonds. Or you might favor tax- free bonds over taxable ones, depending on your tax status and the type of account in which the bonds are held.


Asset allocation strategies


There are various approaches to calculating an asset allocation that makes sense for you. The most popular approach is to look at what you're investing for and how long you have to reach each goal. Those goals get balanced against your need for money to live on. The more secure your immediate income and the longer you have to pursue your investing goals, the more aggressively you might be able to invest for them. Your asset allocation might have a greater percentage of stocks than either bonds or cash, for example. Or you might be in the opposite situation. If you're stretched financially and would have to tap your investments in an emergency, you'll need to balance that fact against your longer-term goals. In addition to establishing an emergency fund, you may need to invest more conservatively than you might otherwise want to. Some investors believe in shifting their assets among asset classes based on which types of investments they expect will do well or poorly in the near term. However, this approach, called "market timing," is extremely difficult even for experienced investors. If you're determined to try this, you should probably get some expert advice — and recognize that no one really knows where markets are headed. Some people try to match market returns with an overall "core" strategy for most of their portfolio. They then put a smaller portion in very targeted investments that may behave very differently from those in the core and provide greater overall diversification. These often are asset classes that an investor thinks could benefit from more active management.

Just as you allocate your assets in an overall portfolio, you can also allocate assets for a specific goal. For example, you might have one asset allocation for retirement savings and another for college tuition bills. A retired professional with a conservative overall portfolio might still be
comfortable investing more aggressively with money intended to be a grandchild's inheritance. Someone who has taken the risk of starting a business might decide to be more conservative with his or her personal portfolio.


Things to think about

 
  • Don't forget about the impact of inflation on your savings. As time goes by, your money will probably buy less and less unless your portfolio at least keeps pace with the inflation rate. Even if you think of yourself as a conservative investor, your asset allocation should take long-term inflation into account.
  • Your asset allocation should balance your financial goals with your emotional needs. If the way your money is invested keeps you awake worrying at night, you may need to rethink your investing goals and whether the strategy you're pursuing is worth the lost sleep.
  • Your tax status might affect your asset allocation, though your decisions shouldn't be based solely on tax concerns.
Even if your asset allocation was right for you when you chose it, it may not be appropriate for you now. It should change as your circumstances do and as new ways to invest are introduced. A piece of clothing you wore 10 years ago may not fit now; you just might need to update your asset allocation, too.

Get started with Kirtland Financial Services today!
 
Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. All indices are unmanaged and may not be invested into directly.

The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax planning or legal advice. We suggest that you consult with a qualified tax or legal professional.

LPL Financial Representatives offer access to Trust Services through The Private Trust Company N.A., an affiliate of LPL Financial.

Investments Savings Retirement
Investing is risky! Right?

You have many options for investing your money, each with a different potential for risk and return. Many options offer the potential for higher returns but pose a risk to your principal balance. Other investing options, such as the Market-Linked Certificate of Deposit (CD), offer an alternative path for potentially growing your money.

Kirtland Financial Services can help you invest in several different ways—now including Market-Linked CDs.

A market-linked CD offers the same type of security for your principal investment as a traditional certificate of deposit but with the potential to earn more than investing in a traditional bank CD.

WHO MIGHT CONSIDER A MARKET-LINKED CD?
  • Anyone who has suffered market losses in the past and is hesitant to risk principal again.
  • Anyone who wants to grow their money beyond the constraints of traditional savings methods.
  • Retirees and others who are in risk-averse situations.

ARE MARKET-LINKED CDs INSURED?
Yes, Market-Linked CDs carry federal deposit insurance administered by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and are backed by the full faith and credit of the US Government up to a maximum amount for all deposits held in the same legal capacity per depository institution. In general, the FDIC feature guarantees principal of, and any accrued interest on, the Market-Linked CDs up to $250,000 if held to maturity.

ANYTHING ELSE I SHOULD KNOW?
Market-Linked CDs are highly versatile instruments that may fit a variety of market outlooks and may hedge a variety of existing positions.

They also offer an estate feature known as a “death put” or “survivor’s option”—a benefit that may be appealing to investors concerned about their estate because their beneficiaries may be able to redeem the Market-Linked CD at par, without interest, before maturity upon death or adjudication of incompetence, subject to the terms and limitations of the issuer.

The Wealth Management Advisors at Kirtland Financial Services are ready to discuss the ins and outs of Market-Linked CDs as a possible investment option as part of your overall financial strategy.

Let the team at Kirtland Financial Services help you focus your goals and make an investment plan that’s right for you and your situation.

Make your appointment now!

 
Principal protection is the return of an investor’s initial principal amount if held to maturity. MLCDs should be purchased with the intention of holding until maturity. Some MLCDs may offer an early redemption opportunity, allowing holders the option to redeem prior to maturity. Generally, MLCDs held to maturity are entitled to full return of the principal amount invested. A secondary market for the MLCDs may develop, although there is no guarantee that any person will maintain a secondary market. The value of the MLCD sold prior to maturity in the secondary market will be subject to the prevailing marketing conditions and may include a transaction charge. The sale proceeds may be less or more than the original purchase amount paid. Market-Linked CDs are FDIC insured up to the FDIC limits. Any amount that exceeds the FDIC limits is subject to the credit and claims paying ability of the issuer. 

Subject to particular offering documentation. Participation in any underlying or linked product is subject to certain caps and restrictions. There is no guarantee of return above principal.

Return of principal is subject to the credit risk of the issuer.

1
 

Securities and advisory services are offered through LPL Financial (LPL), a registered investment advisor and broker-dealer (member FINRA/SIPC). Insurance products are offered through LPL or its licensed affiliates. Kirtland Federal Credit Union and Kirtland Financial Services are not registered as a broker-dealer or investment advisor. Registered representatives of LPL offer products and services using Kirtland Financial Services, and may also be employees of Kirtland Federal Credit Union. These products and services are being offered through LPL or its affiliates, which are separate entities from, and not affiliates of, Kirtland Federal Credit Union or Kirtland Financial Services. Securities and insurances offered through LPL or its affiliates are:

Not NCUA Insured or Any Other Government  | No Credit Union Guaranteed | Not Credit Union Deposits or Obligations | May Lose Value

The LPL Financial registered representatives associated with this website may discuss and/or transact business only with residents of the states in which they are properly registered or licensed. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident of any other state.

LPL Privacy Policy | Make Appointment